Would you like to participate in a research study for endometriosis?

We are inviting you to take part in a research study for patients with endometriosis. If you participate, you will receive:

  • Oral study medication and study related care at no cost to you
  • Close monitoring by the study doctor and his/her experienced staff
  • Information about endometriosis and how to manage your symptoms

Your participation may help advance medical knowledge of endometriosis. Compensation for time and travel may be provided. No health insurance is required.

The Schumann Study is evaluating an investigational oral medication to see if it may safely and effectively reduce endometriosis pain.

You may be eligible to participate if you:

  • Are 18 years or older
  • Have been surgically diagnosed with endometriosis
  • Experience moderate to severe pain from endometriosis
Subjects who take part in the study may receive compensation for time and travel.
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Sign Up

What happens if I sign up? We will match you to a study location in your area that needs patients with endometriosis or notify you when one becomes available. The study site will then contact you and you may have the opportunity to participate if you are qualified.


If you think you might like to participate in the Schumann Study or would like more information, please enter your information below so we can see if you may qualify and can contact you about the study. Keep in mind that participation is entirely voluntary. If you do decide to take part in a study, you may change your mind about participating at any time.

About Endometriosis

Endometriosis is an often painful disorder in which tissue similar to the tissue that normally lines the inside of your uterus — the endometrium — grows outside your uterus.1 It is commonly diagnosed between the ages of 25-35 years.2

Typical symptoms of endometriosis may include:

  • Pain, generally in the abdomen, lower back, and/or pelvis
  • Painful cramps during your periods
  • Pain during sex
  • Heavy periods and bleeding between periods
  • Infertility2

There are treatment options for the pain and infertility associated with endometriosis, but there is currently no known cure. Patients may be treated with hormone therapy, pain medications, and surgical treatments. Hormone therapies, such as gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) medicines, oral contraceptives (birth control pills), and progestins, stop the ovaries from producing hormones and usually prevent ovulation, which can be effective in treating the pain associated with endometriosis. Pain medications may also work well for patients if symptoms are mild. If medical treatments are ineffective in managing pain, surgical treatments can provide significant, but short-term, relief from the pain associated with endometriosis by removal of the endometrial lesions.

The Schumann Study is evaluating an investigational oral medication to see if it may safely and effectively reduce endometriosis pain.

Frequently Asked Questions

What is a research study?

Research studies (also known as clinical trials) evaluate new ways to prevent, detect, diagnose, or treat conditions. They help determine whether investigational medications are safe and effective.

If you qualify and decide to participate, you will receive:

  • Oral study medication and study related care at no cost to you
  • Close monitoring by the study doctor and his/her experienced staff
  • Information about endometriosis and how to manage your symptoms

Your participation may help advance medical knowledge of endometriosis.

The Schumann Study is evaluating an investigational oral medication to see if it may safely and effectively reduce endometriosis pain.

Many subjects will participate at doctors’ offices (research sites) in Europe, North America and Asia Pacific. Your participation may help us learn more about endometriosis.

Throughout the study, you will have regular contact with the study staff who will monitor your health closely. There will be 6 to 7 visits or 9 to 10 visits to the study doctor's office depending on the oral medication that you will get. Certain tests will be performed throughout the study:

  • Physical exam
  • Gynecological exam
  • Transvaginal Ultrasound
  • Blood draws/Urine test
  • Completion of questionnaires on paper during site visits or an electronic device

There will be three longer visits that will last at least 4 hours. During these visits, several blood samples will be taken to better understand how the investigational oral medication is absorbed into our blood, how it is broken down (metabolized) by our body and how it leaves our body (excreted).

Participation is completely voluntary; there is no obligation to participate. You can withdraw at any time, for any reason.

If you leave the study early, it is recommended that you let the study team complete some final assessments. It is important to return for a final study visit to allow the study team to perform all the safety assessments.

The study doctor and their experienced staff will be able to explain more about what the Schumann Study will involve, and it is up to you to decide if you want to take part. Participation in this study is voluntary. Whether or not you decide to participate in this study will not affect your current or future relationships with your doctors. If you decide to participate, you are free to withdraw at any time without affecting those relationships.

We match you to a study office within a close travel distance from your home. If we are not running the study in your area currently, with your permission, we will keep you in our database and reach out once a study in your area becomes available. If, at any time, you decide you no longer want your information stored, you can opt out and we will delete your details. If you have any questions regarding the handling of the information you have provided to autocruitment.com, or if you would like to make any changes, please contact us at info@autocruitment.com.

About the Schumann Study

The Schumann Study (NCT04614246) will enroll 420 subjects with endometriosis from 20 countries. The Schumann Study will include 3 parts: Screening, Study Treatment, and Follow-Up. The study is planned for a maximum of 40 weeks and includes a maximum of 9 to 10 visits to the study doctor’s office.

Screening
5-15 Weeks
Study Treatment
12 Weeks
Follow-Up
5-13 Weeks

Screening: The purpose of the screening period is to determine whether you are eligible to participate.

Study Treatment: If qualified, you will receive either: 1 of 3 doses of the investigational oral medication, placebo (a tablet without active medicine), or an active comparator (another medication that has already been approved to treat pain associated with endometriosis). You will take the study medication every day for 12 weeks. You will come to the study office for study visits at regular intervals. At most visits, you will answer questions about your symptoms, your health, and your medications. Between visits, you will use the eDiary daily to record your symptoms, your pregnancy tests, and your study related medications.

Follow-up: After receiving the final dose of the study medication, you will come back to the study office for one or two follow-up visits either 5 or 13 weeks later. Some of the same tests and procedures that you have undergone during the study will be repeated. The follow-up visit is to check on your well-being and health.

If you participate, you will receive:

  • Oral study medication and study related care at no cost to you
  • Close monitoring by the study doctor and his/her experienced staff
  • Information about endometriosis and how to manage your symptoms

Your participation may help advance medical knowledge of endometriosis.

Subjects who qualify to take part in the study may receive compensation for time and travel.

Who can take part in the Schumann Study?

You may be eligible to participate if you:

  • Are 18 years or older
  • Have been surgically diagnosed with endometriosis
  • Experience moderate to severe pain from endometriosis

All study related care is provided by the study doctor.

The Schumann Study is evaluating an investigational oral medication to see if it may safely and effectively reduce endometriosis pain.